Concise history of smartwatches

Categories: Articles, Gadgets
Tags: No Tags
Comments: No Comments
Published on: December 23, 2017

A nice overview of history of smartwatches from Hodinkee.

 

“…. Smartwatches and their predecessors, wrist computers, have been the reluctant revolution. Over the years, they have come in waves, arriving with a big splash, then sinking out of sight. Even the 2003 entrance into the market by the then almighty Microsoft with its Smart Personal Object Technology (SPOT) for watches couldn’t make smartwatches mainstream.

Until 2015, what smartwatch had been a hit the way Seiko was in the 1970s, Swatch in the 1980s, or the Rolex Daytona in the 1990s? After a while, one wondered what the deal was with smartwatches: Were they a major development in watch history? A niche toy for tech-geeks? Or simply a long-running, highly entertaining freak-watch sideshow?

Apple has changed all that. The Apple effect on the watch market has been profound. The revolution now has its monster hit watch. Global sales of smartwatches totaled 4.2 million pieces in 2014, according to International Data Corp., the research firm. It rose to 19.4 million in 2015, the year Apple Series 0 (as some call it) went on sale. Apple accounted for 11.6 million of those, according to IDC estimates.

…”

 

more of this here: [The link]

[2017] Road trip to Pyrenees mountains in France & Spain

Categories: Blogs, Travel
Tags: No Tags
Comments: No Comments
Published on: June 6, 2017

Belgium –> Bourdeaux, Fr –> San Sebastian, Es, –> Pamplona, Es –> Candanchu, Es –> Bareges, Fr –> Andorra –> Toulouse, Fr –> Limoges, Fr –> Belgium

Some pics from the road

The Maintainers

Categories: Blogs, SciTech
Tags: No Tags
Comments: No Comments
Published on: January 31, 2017

An interesting movement/conference that caught my eye recently:

Many groups and individuals today celebrate “innovation.” The notion is influential not only in engineering and business, but also in the social sciences, arts, and humanities. For example, “innovation” has become a staple of analysis in popular histories – such as Walter Isaacson’s recent book, The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution.

This conference takes a different approach, one whose conceptual starting point was a playful proposal for a counter-volume to Isaacson’s that could be titled The Maintainers: How a Group of Bureaucrats, Standards Engineers, and Introverts Made Technologies That Kind of Work Most of the Time. Conference participants come from a variety of fields, including academic historians and social scientists, as well as artists, activists, and engineers.  All share an interest in the concepts of maintenance, infrastructure, repair, and the myriad forms of labor and expertise that sustain our human-built world.

[The Link]

[2016] Seth Godin: No one is unreasonable

Categories: Articles, Blogs
Tags: No Tags
Comments: No Comments
Published on: July 9, 2016

Interesting post from Seth Godin: “No one is unreasonable”

“No one says, “I’m going to be unfair to this person today, brutal in fact, even though they don’t deserve it or it’s not helpful.”

Few people say, “I know that this person signed the contract and did what they promised, but I’m going to rip them off, just because I can.”

And it’s quite rare to have someone say, “I’m a selfish narcissist, and everyone should revolve around me merely because I said so.”

In fact, all of us have a narrative. It’s the story we tell ourselves about how we got here, what we’re building, what our urgencies are.

And within that narrative, we act in a way that seems reasonable.

To be clear, the narrative isn’t true. It’s merely our version, our self-talk about what’s going on. It’s the excuses, perceptions and history we’ve woven together to get through the world. It’s our grievances and our perception of privilege, our grudges and our loves.

No one is unreasonable. Or to be more accurate, no one thinks that they are being unreasonable.

That’s why we almost never respond well when someone points out how unreasonable we’re being. We don’t see it, because our narrative of the world around us won’t allow us to. Our worldview makes it really difficult to be empathetic, because seeing the world through the eyes of someone else takes so much effort.

It’s certainly possible to change someone’s narrative, but it takes time and patience and leverage. Teaching a new narrative is hard work, essential work, but something that is difficult to do at scale.

In the short run, our ability to treat different people differently means that we can seek out people who have a narrative that causes them to engage with us in reasonable ways. When we open the door for these folks, we’re far more likely to create the impact that we seek. No one thinks they’re unreasonable, but you certainly don’t have to work with the people who are.

And, if you’re someone who finds that your narrative isn’t helping you make the impact you seek, best to look hard at your narrative, the way you justify your unreasonableness, not the world outside. “

[The Link]

Some recent GYW boots

Categories: Blogs, Photography
Tags: No Tags
Comments: No Comments
Published on: July 9, 2016

Redwing IR: 8111, Redwing IR: 8112, Santalum brown pull up

[NYT: 2016] What was the greatest era of innovation?

Categories: Articles, SciTech
Tags: No Tags
Comments: No Comments
Published on: May 14, 2016

An interesting article in NYT..

“We thought a better way to understand the significance of technological change would be to walk through how Americans lived, ate, traveled, and clothed and entertained themselves in 1870, 1920, 1970 and the present [2016]. This tour is both inspired by and reliant on Robert J. Gordon’s authoritative examination of innovation through the ages, “The Rise and Fall of American Growth,” published this year. These are portraits of each point in time, culled from Mr. Gordon’s research; you can decide for yourself which era is truly most transformative.”

 

NYT: [The link]

Scientific studies: last week tonight

Categories: Talks
Tags: No Tags
Comments: No Comments
Published on: May 9, 2016

[2015] Collection of fountain pens

Categories: Blogs, Photography
Tags: No Tags
Comments: No Comments
Published on: May 25, 2015

Fountain pens Left2Right

  1. Waterman Hemisphere [F]
  2. Lamy Safari [F]
  3. Montblanc LeGrand (146) [EF]
  4. Waterman Expert [F]
  5. Cross Townsend [F]
  6. Gama Eyas Ebonite [F]
  7. Gama Popular Ebonite [F]
  8. Jinhao X450 Black [M]
  9. Jinhao X450 Deep Red [M]
  10. Lanbitou 865 [F]
  11. Baoer 388 Marble Blue [M]
  12. Hero329 Red [F]
  13. Parker Frontier Black [F]
  14. Pelikan Gallery Getaway [M]

A drive around Belgium

Categories: Blogs, Travel
Tags: No Tags
Comments: No Comments
Published on: April 13, 2015

A few pics from the drive:

Photo & Video Sharing by SmugMug

Photo & Video Sharing by SmugMug

Photo & Video Sharing by SmugMug

What is literature for? [A. D. Botton]

Categories: Articles
Tags: No Tags
Comments: No Comments
Published on: October 26, 2014

«page 1 of 16
Welcome , today is Saturday, December 7, 2019